Tag Archives: Before Midnight

Top Ten of 2013

Frances-Ha-film-still-31. Frances Ha (dir. Noah Baumbach, 2013, US) – A sensitive look at the ever-increasing pangs of quarter-life crises. An immaculate twinning of star Greta Gerwig and director Noah Baumbach, who each line the precipices of contemporary cinematic visions of stilted adulthood and angst. A beautiful monochrome love letter to New York City by way of the French New Wave, Woody Allen style. A perfect film that spoke to me in innumerable ways.

Breaking-Bad_32. Breaking Bad – Season Five, part 2 (x8) (Cr. Vince Gilligan, 2013, AMC, US) – Completing both a perfect season of television and arguably one of the finest TV dramas ever created, these 8 episodes were a sensational concoction of the show’s finest ingredients, blended together to produce a thudding, devastating curtain close for television’s finest anti-hero: Walter White, whose journey from Mr. Chips to Scarface reaches its poetic conclusion.

Standout episode: Ozymandias (s05xe14, dir. Rian Johnson): Perhaps one of the most heartbreaking, shocking and unrestrainedly shattering episodes of television ever made. Johnson extends the show’s cinematic roots and delivers something that is at once a turning point for every character involved and a treatise on the slow-ebbing consequences of deceit.

28-before-midnight3. Before Midnight (dir. Richard Linklater, 2013, US) – One of the many jewels in the series’ crown is the searing, incredibly attuned and humanistic writing and delineation of its characters, and Midnight upholds this and remains as true to its own canon as it is to the reality it so believably upholds. Yet, where the opening two chapters were entrenched in illusory romanticism (especially Sunset), the tone here is faintly darker as the simmering themes and various contexts of Jesse and Celine’s conversations take on restless, even drastic edges. Mature topics such as sex, parenthood and careers are explored, as are the permutations that lay, gestating, in between. (Reviewed for The Hollywood News)

12-years14. 12 Years a Slave (dir. Steve McQueen, 2013, US) – Subjecting the art gloss of previous films Hunger and Shame to a more formal model, McQueen’s latest is a towering achievement; an unremitting and equally gut-wrenching combined vision of survival and the hideousness of an evil that continues to stagnate in America’s past.

3NO9_StarredUp5. Starred Up (dir. David Mackenzie, 2013, UK) – A murky concoction of Alan Clarke-esque grit and Shane Meadows’ stark realism, Mackenzie’s latest is a pinned-backed and rough-edged prison drama that takes an unflinching look at institutionalisation, paternity, the unwritten hierarchies of prison and how destructive lifestyles could be seen as strikingly hereditary. With a vérité, fly on the wall approach and superb naturalistic performances (especially from Jack O’Connell and Ben Mendelsohn, playing father and son), this may be the stand-out British film of 2014 when it’s released in March.

leaves-upstream-color-reelgood6. Upstream Colour (dir. Shane Carruth, 2013, US) – Just as his first project, Primer, saw Carruth shunning established filmic principles in his approach to implementing the science fiction genre, his latest is more of an innate symphony of ostracism sung from a deeply idiosyncratic voice; an ambitious, inventive and hypnotically contemplative entity wholly beyond compare. It is within a lack of empathy for, and simultaneous defiance of, narrative codes and genre conventions that make this one of the most challenging and markedly unclassifiable films to emanate from American independent cinema in quite some time. (Reviewed for The Hollywood News)

blue-jasmine-cate-blanchett17. Blue Jasmine (dir. Woody Allen, 2013, US) – However patchy his 21st century offerings have been, Allen’s tenacious film-a-year approach has paid dividends in numerously rewarding and productive ways, though its arguable that none have been as achingly, bitterly human, or indeed contemporary, as this. Through the prism of a Tennessee Williams-style outline, Blue Jasmine is another notch on a long list of strong female-led films for the seasoned filmmaker, one that – instead of merely adopting caricatures – retools them to mount a portrait of self-indulgence, privilege and deceit gone crushingly sour. It’s a weighty and progressively devastating drama with a chilly conclusion; an ending where the lyrics of the film’s title track, Blue Moon, ring wholly, hauntingly true for all involved. (Reviewed for The Hollywood News)

don_apartment38. Mad Men – Season Six (x13) (Cr. Matthew Weiner, 2013, AMC, US) – Essentially answering the question posed to central character Don Draper at the close of season 5 (“Are you alone?”), this sixth season makes atonal lurches from one unexpected plot curve to the next as it burrows further into Don’s shadowy cerebral cortex. A murkier tone – mirroring the tumultuousness of 1968 America – may make this one of the show’s weaker seasons, but a tepid season of Mad Men is still one of the best shows on television, and this makes for a memorably hectic prelude to season seven’s two-tiered series finisher.

Standout episode: The Better Half (s06xe09, dir. Phil Abraham): An unlikely tryst between Don and ex-wife Betty, sharing screen time for the first time since season 4, further sheds light on Don’s doomed approach to companionship, devotion and fidelity.

Spring-Breakers-promo06-780x5209. Spring Breakers (dir. Harmony Korine, 2012, US) – Embracing the mainstream whilst simultaneously challenging its codes, Korine’s latest is his most fully realised and accessible film to date; a provocative study of chaos that refuses to sugarcoat the ugliness of what it both admires and reproaches. This could so easily have become what it has been advertised as: a cheap and tawdry perusal through its subject matter, using bikini-clad protagonists as exemplars of the accoutrements of present-day youth. Yet it isn’t merely a straightforward depiction of Girls Gone Wild-inspired carnage; quite the contrary in fact. It digs deep into the psyche and inner-workings of the central friendship, the allure of bad behaviour and self-destructiveness, and how the choices these girls make – and the impact of Britney Spears – reverberates and has repercussions.(Reviewed for Take One)

gimme-the-loot-gimme-the-loot-02-01-2013-4-g10. Gimme the Loot (dir. Adam Leon, 2012, US) – The feature debut of resident New Yorker Leon, this is an authentic and charming story of desperation and the desire to leave ones mark in a modern city that doesn’t particularly care for the protagonist’s outwardly diminutive voices. (Reviewed for CineVue)

Honourable mentions:

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Blackfish (dir. Gabriela Cowperthwaite, 2013, US) – Searing and emotionally exhausting, what Cowperthwaite’s documentary lacks in analytical edges it more than makes up for in the sheer weight and comprehension of its central thesis: the destructive ignorance of SeaWorld and animal captivity.

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Girls – Season Two (x10) (cr. Lena Dunham, 2013, HBO, US) – Small screen auteur Lena Dunham’s excellent, ultra-hip series gets darker and more mature as it goes on, growing into an already well established groove whilst – unlike its protagonists – developing its sense of self.

Standout episode: It’s Back (s02xe08, dir. Jesse Peretz): A superb rug-puller that exemplifies Dunham’s prowess as an actress, storyteller and sculptor of authentic characters with authentic problems.

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Southcliffe (x4) (dir. Sean Durkin, 2013, UK) – Another harrowing offering from Durkin, who transcends and repackages his cinematic presence into this startlingly effective British miniseries, which focuses on a town’s devastation brought on by a spate of shootings. A staggering portrait of manifested frustration and grief, stuffed with excellent performances.

Standout episode: Sorrow’s Child (e03, dir. Sean Durkin). Actor Anatol Yusef effectively plumbs the depth of his character, Paul’s, anguish, building to rousing, hair-raising final moments soundtracked by Otis Redding.

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Museum Hours (dir. Jem Cohen, 2012, Austria) – A lucid, dreamy dissertation on the simultaneous intimacy and implacability of life, death and the art of simply looking.

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After Lucia (dir. Michel Franco, 2012, Mexico) – Released straight to DVD here in the UK, this is a gruelling portrait of bullying and the evils of youth that deserves a wider audience, if not for the relentless torment of its protagonist then for the spectacular performance from the actress who plays her, Tessa Ia. (featured on Best of 2012 list)

(A list dedicated solely to 2013 UK releases can be found on HeyUGuys’ Movie Bloggers poll)

Best Films of 2013 (so far)

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1. Upstream Color (Shane Carruth)
2. Before Midnight (Richard Linklater)
3. Frances Ha (Noah Baumbach)
4. Spring Breakers (Harmony Korine)
5. Django Unchained (Quentin Tarantino)
6. Gimme the Loot (Adam Leon)
7. Cloud Atlas (Andy Wachowski, Lana Wachowski, Tom Tykwer)
8. The Great Gatsby (Baz Luhrmann)
9. This Is the End (Evan Goldberg, Seth Rogen)
10. Elysium (Neill Blompkamp)

Review: Before Midnight

before-midnight

(Dir. Richard Linklater)

(Originally posted at The Hollywood News)

Nine years after sating the impassioned fans of modest 1994 indie darling Before Sunrise with its more heart-breaking counterpart Before Sunset, director Richard Linklater and stars Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke return to the franchise with Before Midnight, a natural, inevitable progression for this most magnificent of cinematic series. Set, just as the narrative spine, eighteen years since Sunrise, Midnight revisits the characters of Celine (Delpy) and Jesse (Hawke) for another excursion in walk-and-talk existential intimacy, as these now-fully recognisable people muse about life, love and togetherness under the scrutiny of the pervading Greek sun.

 After having witnessed the pair meeting – and quickly falling in love – as young adults wandering the streets of Vienna in 1995, and again seeing their belated reunion in Paris, 2004, where the spark of their initial encounter still rigorously lingered, Linklater (who once again co-writes the screenplay with his leading compadres) here confirms their union. Since Sunset left on an elegant cliffhanger, with Jesse anxiously twiddling his wedding ring as Celine bashfully, seductively mimicked Nina Simone in her apartment (“Baby, you are gonna miss that plane”), this third instalment finds the pair married and parents to two young girls, holidaying in Greece and at something of an impasse.

 Jesse, who enjoys the fruits of his worldwide acclaim as a successful writer (his two previous novels fictionalised the events of the two preceding films), finds it increasingly difficult to maintain a long-distance relationship with his teenage son, and ruminates about a possible relocation for his new family to Chicago to be closer to him. Celine, on the other hand, finds herself struggling both with Jesse’s narrativised treatment of their longstanding relationship and the expectations of her as a woman and depended-on mother, all the while considering a major career change. Whilst the beatific surface of their relationship remains intact, its beating heart grows weary and cracks start to materialise, and the couple find themselves contemplating their marriage and its rickety, unknowable future.

 Where Sunrise was a more formalist excursion within the romance genre – though its inventiveness and enclosed, one-day progression stopped it from being too conventional, and Sunset took on a real-time approach to the depiction of Jesse and Celine’s meeting, Before Midnight is its own beast; its effectively five long, glorious scenes of the protagonists breaking down their life together and considering its numerous ups and downs. One of many jewels in the series’ crown is the searing, incredibly attuned and humanistic writing and delineation of its characters, and Midnight upholds this and remains as true to its own canon as it is to life. Jesse is still the buzzingly sanguine writer constantly thinking of outlandish stories and concepts; Celine remains the slightly pessimistic intellectual, irritated by a constantly diminishing world. Yet, whereas the opening two chapters were entrenched in illusory romanticism, the tone here is faintly darker as the simmering themes and various contexts of Jesse and Celine’s conversations take on restless, even drastic edges. Mature topics such as sex, parenthood and careers are explored, as are the permutations that lay in between.

 There’s a reason why the film’s closing scenes – and, indeed, its title – are staged at the twilight of the day, where the sun gives way to darkness; its pivotal sequence, staged in a hotel room, charts the anger and frustrations of a prolonged argument. It is insular and claustrophobic, contrasting with the open-aired, flowing dialogue scenes before it, and building to an aching and beautifully organic climax that could lead to a fully justified fourth instalment. At a time where cinema is constantly being held up against television and accused of lacking the intricacies and intimacy of long-form storytelling, it’s invigorating to know that Linklater and co continue to break the mould by shaping and kneading their outstanding creation. Before Midnight is, of course, powerfully acted and extraordinarily well judged; a worthy successor to two perfect entries.